How to tell if you’re being watched by your driver

Posted November 09, 2018 05:03:56 A man has spoken out about his experience driving a car with a camera in it.

Ryan McAllister was behind the wheel of his black Mercedes E63 AMG in Sydney’s CBD on Tuesday when he saw the camera mounted on the dashboard of a passing car.

“I was looking at it at the time, it was a bit of a surreal thing,” he told ABC Radio Sydney.

“[I thought] ‘Is this what I’m supposed to be driving?

Are these really the cars that are driving me?'”

“So when the guy was coming past, he went up and put it on the dash and said, ‘Look, you have this, it’s a police camera’.” “Then he just put it up on the window and looked out the window, so I just got out of the car and said ‘what’s going on?'”

He said he was then told he was being watched.

‘They can’t stop me from doing this’ Mr McAllisters reaction is reminiscent of an incident earlier this year when a man was arrested and charged after his car was stopped by a police car.

In that case, he was not wearing a seatbelt and his license plate was on the passenger side.

The man was also told he had been warned about the cameras and had no option but to remove the camera from his car.

But Mr McAlliers view of the situation was different.

Mr MacAllister said he did not feel like he was “treating police officers like they were idiots” by not wearing his seatbelt.

His view of police cars is similar to the one he had seen in the video that caught him and the driver of the speeding car earlier this month.

He also told ABC TV he did feel like the camera was interfering with his driving.

“All officers are trained to observe the rules of the road and are expected to obey them at all times.” “

What you need to know about distracted driving, police and technology In February, a NSW Police officer was charged with driving with an “unreasonable disregard” for safety when he drove through a red light while on duty. “

All officers are trained to observe the rules of the road and are expected to obey them at all times.”

What you need to know about distracted driving, police and technology In February, a NSW Police officer was charged with driving with an “unreasonable disregard” for safety when he drove through a red light while on duty.

But the case has since been dropped after the prosecution claimed the officer had been distracted by other distractions, including text messaging.

Another officer, Sergeant Jason Farrar, was charged last year with a series of offences including driving without a licence and driving while disqualified.

Police say a new law will be introduced in September 2018 that will criminalise drivers who drive while using a mobile phone while on foot, and in public.

It also prohibits using a hand-held mobile phone or electronic device while driving, and will mean police can issue a written warning if they detect a driver using a handheld device.